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  • Are your conversations achieving what you want?
    Are your conversations achieving what you want?
  • Can you allow discussion and still keep control?
    Can you allow discussion and still keep control?
  • Does your feedback help people change?
    Does your feedback help people change?
  • How are you coming across to your boss?
    How are you coming across to your boss?
  • Are you getting the best out of your people?
    Are you getting the best out of your people?
  • Do you frequently get into arguments?
    Do you frequently get into arguments?

Might you learn how to be more assertive and confident at work with this
London, UK based assertiveness training course? 

What is assertiveness?

  • Assertiveness is a speaking skill (as opposed to a listening skill).  It means getting others to recognise and acknowledge our feelings and needs. It makes others takes us seriously, and enables us to set high standards and hold people to them.   
  • Often people become confused between assertiveness and aggression.  When people behave aggressively instead of being confident, firm and strong their conversations can escalate into confrontation.  It is the threat of having a fight their hands that puts people off being assertive, if they aren’t confident of another way to show strength.  It is sensible for people to be nervous about jeopardising valuable but sometimes fragile relationships with colleagues or clients if they believe their communication aren’t quite up to the job and their intentions are likely to be miss-interpreted.  
  • This communication skills training course will teach you assertive behaviour so that you can have confidence to stand up for yourself.  You’ll be able to say what you really think  and how you really feel, without worrying about whether the way you word it is going to ruffle other people’s feathers if they confuse your comments for rudeness.

An example 

Here is an illustration that gives an example of how assertiveness in the workplace can make a big difference to the way others experience you, and in turn the effect you have in the workplace.  People come on this assertiveness training course because they want to know how to be more effective at work as leaders, as well as those wanting to prove their abilities to their manager, and reassure them they can be a safe pair of hands.  Over the years lots of participants have attended our communication skills training courses to develop their skills at dealing with other people.  Does this ring any bells for you or someone you know?

The problem - why is it important being assertive at work?

  • A project leader who was a competent and thorough organiser.  She was very successful with people who were highly motivated, understood what she wanted and were willing to co-operate.  She was less successful with those who were not as co-operative.   She didn’t like having to be firm with people or critical of them, and would have been more assertive at work if she knew how.  She would back off and accept defeat rather than confront disagreements because she equated pushiness or aggressiveness.  Sometimes when competing for resources she lost out to other project leaders who were more persistent in pushing for what they needed.  She often felt discouraged and said very little in meetings with senior managers when others were nosier and more demanding than her because she felt they were not taking her seriously.  Her boss, who knew how ambitious and capable she was, was concerned that she was in danger of being seen by senior managers as ineffective and that this would damage her career if she wasn’t able to figure out how to be more assertive at work.

The diagnosis – what stopped her being confident in meetings?

  • This project leader was a clever, clear and lucid thinker with a quick mind and a good talker who always supported her points with reason, fact and logic.   She was very sensitive to people’s feelings, and quick to notice from facial expression and tone of voice when people were resisting her point.  When this happened she would try again to debate and reason with them.  If this failed she would secretly feel impatient, frustrated and defeated, because she assumed that since the other person was being emotional there was nothing she could do about it.  Her one method of persuasion, relying solely on fact and logic, was unable to deal with emotional responses.  In spite of, or perhaps because of, her sensitivity to emotions she had never learned to deal with them and always did her best to avoid them.  She was therefore initially nervous about being assertive at work.

The obstacle - what she needed to change

  • Her approach was governed by an assumption she had held deep down for as long as she could remember, that “it is safer not to reveal how you feel” than to be assertive at work.  She didn't know how to be assertive without giving away her feelings.   She thought that it would be unprofessional to express emotion.  She was not aware of the underlying assumption, although she would probably admit to it if asked.  Nevertheless it often governed her approach to people, especially when she sensed she was in danger of getting into conflict.  So, she kept her feelings hidden in order to avoid conflict, rather than exploring how to be more assertive at work without jeopardising her safety.  By doing so she not only failed to get what she needed but often courted the very danger she was trying to avoid. 

The remedy – what she needed to learn

  • First, she needed help to become aware that restricting herself to fact and logic was a self-imposed handicap when dealing with people who were resisting.  Second, she needed her underlying assumption - that it is safer not to reveal how you feel - challenged and replaced by a quite different idea, namely, that you can prevent misunderstanding and are more likely to achieve what you want if you talk frankly about your own feelings and show respect and, acknowledgment and appreciation of the other person’s.  Then she needed to be shown a safe and professional way of how to be more assertive at work.  In other words, she needed to learn and practise two skills, speaking assertively and listening with empathy.  Finally, she needed help to practise using these skills in the kinds of meetings and conversations she had been finding difficult, where she needed to know how to be assertive at work.  This was a challenging learning experience for her because of her fear of the dangers of revealing how she felt.  But she knew she had a lot at stake and so with determination and practice over several months was able both to be, and be seen to know how to be more assertive at work, and a more effective influencer.

Why assertive behaviour is not easy.

Many of us are find it difficult because of mental habits we're likely to be unaware of.  The assertiveness training course we specialise in can help you become aware and overcome the habits that are holding you back. 

Here is a list of common obstacles that get in the way.  See whether any of these difficulties ring a bell for you:-

  1. A lack of empathy.  What often prevents people from understanding how to be more assertive at work is that they don't know how to show empathy.   Without empathy you can come over as uncaring and aggressive, and most people are reluctant to give a bad impression, so showing empathy demonstrates your compassion.  By showing empathy it frees you up to be much more assertive.  This is why we include both empathy and assertiveness skills in this assertiveness training course.
  2. A lack of awareness of your own feelings.  Many of us are too preoccupied with our own thoughts and problems to stop and ask ourselves, “What am I experiencing right now?”  Most of us have fallen out of the habit of tuning in to our own feelings.  It may even be that we don't like to dwell on them because they're uncomfortable.  A consequence of shutting them off is that it can inhibit our ability to connect with others.  This assertiveness training course will help you become more aware of your own feelings, so that you can express them safely to other people - see listening with empathy.
  3. A reluctance to express feelings.  Many people have not had much practice in expressing feelings, especially if it was not part of growing up.  What if our feelings get out of control?  It can come as a relief to realise that talking about feelings acts as a safety valve, preventing the build-up of tension and destructive outbursts, rather than causing them.  On our training course participants have lots of practise and experiment in a safe environment.  Assertive people are more comfortable with the idea of how to show more emotional intelligence - see emotional intelligence training.
  4. The belief that other people know how you feel without being told.  Many people believe that their feelings are already known.  But this is usually not correct.  Other people are usually unaware of your feelings. They may be aware you’re in a bad mood, but be unaware of exactly why, what’s caused it, or what you’d like them to do about it.  If we want them to know, we have to tell them.  
  5. The fear of being disliked.  Some people find it hard because they believe it will make them disliked.  But, again, this belief is not correct.  Most people react to frankness, firmness and assertiveness with respect.  This is especially true if you can couple your assertiveness with compassion and empathy.  Again, the safe learning environment of our assertiveness training course can help you overcome any nervousness and to rehearse and practice your skills while seeing how much you can get away with without upsetting or provoking other people.
  6. A mismatch between verbal and non-verbal behaviour.  When the words you speak are matched by your body language, your tone of voice, your facial expression, your pace, your posture and your gestures, the message you send is likely to be convincing.  However, if there is a mismatch, other people often get confused by the misleading signals you are sending and end up not knowing which clue they should trust then most, and your attempts to be show more strength and more confidence at work can be undermined by an impression that you don’t really mean what you are saying.
  7. Not saying what you mean as though you really mean it.  Practise saying what you mean as though you really mean it.  In other words say it as if your life and theirs depends on whether the other person takes what you are saying seriously.  Each of us has our own unique way of speaking when we are being sincere and congruent.   When you do this, incongruent habits fall away.  On our assertiveness training course we encourage participants to experiment by speaking honestly and earnestly in a way that makes it easier for others to take them seriously.
  8. Expecting failure.  Some people carry around (probably unconsciously) an expectation of failure.  This can turn into a self-fulfilling prophecy.  It means they’re reluctant because deep down they’re convinced they’ll not get it or don't deserve it, and the anticipated failure is too painful to risk.  However, self-limiting beliefs can be changed.  But before changing them they have to be brought to the surface where we can see them and challenge them.  Talking about them to someone who can listen patiently and with empathy can help.
  9. Stating my opinion rather than saying how I feel.  Saying, “I feel that …”, following by your opinion isn’t the same thing as giving any information about your emotion.  The trouble with giving your opinion is that others receive it as an invitation to argue.  If you want to know how to be firmer at work it is much more effective to give them a fact they can't argue with – by naming your feeling and making it clear what it is about, and why you feel it.  When we teach people how to be assertive at work we help them become more conscious of the words they’re using and how to coming across more affectively.

Free exploratory coaching session

INTERESTED?

If so, you can have a FREE exploratory coaching session. It'll give you a foretaste of what you can get from the course. You make no commitment to proceed beyond this until you're sure this training is relevant to your own particular need.

How to accept this offer

Simply contact us for a preliminary chat and to arrange your free exploratory coaching session. 

What this session will do for you

In this session we'll aim to give you something practical you can use right away that'll help you handle a difficult situation more successfully at work. All you need do to prepare for this session is think about the kinds of situations you want to be able to handle more successfully.

FAQs

You'll find answers to many of your questions about the content and method of this course under FAQs (in the main menu above).

 

We love helping you communicate successfully

By giving you communication skills that'll transform even your most challenging relationships and interactions.

That's the purpose of Skills with People, our training course for managers and professional people at all levels. Thousands have benefited from this course.

What People Have Said About The Course

Feedback from participant's boss - a Kimberley-Clark marketing director

He is now aware of his need to control his direct approach. He was sometimes too assertive. I think he is now well balanced in this respect.

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Thank you from a participant

I wanted to let you know that I have secured a new role.  I had to go through an assessment centre and one challenge was to negotiate with a 'belliger ...

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Project Quality Engineer (self funding)

A lesson for life! The power of effective communication is incredible when one masters the skills "listen with empathy" / "speak assertively". Defin ...

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EHS advisor (environmental health and safety), Johnson Matthey

This is the best non-techincal course the company has ever put me on because it's the most useful. 

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Golf Club Manager

Ten out of ten for the course for me personally. I think I would have resigned if it hadn't been for the course.

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Workshop Manager, Professional Plant Services

I now find it easier to have awkward conversations. (As a result of how he has changed several more people from his company are asking to attend the c ...

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Fundraising Officer, United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR)

A very intimate training which will make anyone reflect on how best to engage with colleagues when confronted with difficult situations.

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The wife of a participant

"Just thinking about last night’s conversation and it’s bringing tears to my eyes – it’s what I’ve always wanted: to be able to talk with you like tha ...

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Feedback from a participant's boss - a Glaxo SmithKline research director

He has made good progress in two areas: 1. team leadership - he listens with empathy to others well and considers their standpoint as well as his own. ...

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Theatre Manager

Managing to confront them but still maintain their cooperation and support. Previously I was either not confronting or confronting and ending up with ...

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Feedback from participant's boss - a Prudential director

He is a lot more confident. At the last meeting of our business unit leaders he fully led the meeting and dealt with people very well.

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Feedback from participant's boss - an HSBC investment director

I have had three unprompted comments from different team members and colleagues who have been surprised at the consideration he has shown in helping s ...

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Leisure Centre Manager

The most useful part of the course was learning how to convey my disappointment with a member of staff without demotivating them, without making them ...

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Feedback from participant's boss - a Johnson & Johnson marketing director

She has become increasingly aware and focussed on ensuring she is gaining cooperation from colleagues by the way she approaches situations. E.g., Meet ...

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Feedback from a participant's boss - a WS Atkins director

Now he actively listens, probes, asks for clarifications and does not assume anymore he knows the answer.

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Feedback from participant's boss - Chairman of White Clarke Group

He has greatly improved his ability to manage a situation. He listens more and uses that information to convince. A good example is the .... group, wh ...

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Sports Centre Manager

I feel that my relationship with other attendees has improved massively following the session. I'd say 9/10 for what I've got from the course as I sa ...

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Feedback from participant's boss - A Philips Semiconductors director

To what extend do I think his training need has been satisfied? Completely. I have been approached by 4 peers to tell me that they could see a very po ...

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Senior Resource Consultant, Shell International

“Skills with People” has helped me deal with conflict situations.  It has helped me to diffuse tension in meetings and convert pushback into alignment ...

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Feedback from participant's boss - a Billiton director

He's obviously making a positive effort and it does show. People used to be scared of him. No longer.

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Senior Engineer, Qualcomm

An unbelievable experience, highly motivating training and one of the few which stays forever in your mind. A tangible impact to your life and workin ...

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Feedback from a participant's boss - a Merck Sharp & Dohme medical director

She feels more confident in tackling people and has been impressed with her new found techniques, e.g., in dealing with members of the marketing depar ...

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Feedback from participant's boss - a Johnson Matthey Catalysts (Germany) senior manager

There has been a noticeable improvement in the performance of this customer service engineer. He is much more succinct now than he was before. He was ...

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Feedback from participant's boss - a Johnson & Johnson finance director

He has made excellent progress in the management of his team. He has ensured key stakeholders are involved in decision-making and has gone to great le ...

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Feedback from participant's boss - head of projects in Heinz

He now gains support through his willingness to involve people more and take them with him.

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Feedback from a participant's boss - a Shell International senior manager

He is showing far more self-awareness and more restraint in potentially confrontational situations. He is far more aware of the impact his actions and ...

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Learning & Development Coordinator - The Entertainer

I can't recommend this course enough. It has genuinely been the most impactful course I have ever completed. Understanding that I can be assertive w ...

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National Training Index* report on the course

"From delegates reports we have identified Skills with People is a 'highspot' among UK business courses. Delegates mentioned as most helpful the enha ...

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Examples of Training Needs Met

Well intentioned but demoralising his team Read More...
Very diligent but hated dealing with difficult people Read More...
Forceful communicator who created friction Read More...
Lots of energy and ideas but little attention for his clients Read More...
Enormous enthusiasm but little sensitivity Read More...
Being more assertive would help career go better Read More...
Preparing for a more challenging role Read More...
Difficulty communicating with non-technical people Read More...
Technically very sound but lacking persuasive skills Read More...
Not delegating or developing others Read More...
Flying high but creating a tense atmosphere Read More...
Allowed his meetings to get out of hand Read More...
Had a positive attitude but gave a negative impression Read More...
Very logical but not creating enough rapport Read More...
Respected specialist who was too quiet at meetings Read More...

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